The Times & other London newspapers

The Times, Friday 15 April 1892, page 7

DORSET COUNTY HOSPITAL.–Colonel WILLIAMS, of Bridehead, near Dorchester, a director of the London and South-Western Railway Company, has presented to the Dorset County Hospital £1,000, in memory of his father, the late Mr. Robert WILLIAMS.

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The Times, Saturday 21 February 1903, page 12

PROSPECTIVE ARRANGEMENTS. MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23.

Sir Frederick TREVES opens the new operating theatre at the Dorset County Hospital, Dorchester.

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The Times, 25 February 1903, page 14

SIR FREDERICK TREVES ON THE ADVANCE OF SURGICAL SCIENCE. –Sir Frederick Treves paid a visit to Dorchester, his native place, on Monday, for the purpose of formally opening the new operating theatre at the Dorset County Hospital. The theatre has been erected by public subscription, Lord Eldon giving £500, Lord Ilchester £250, Lord Wimborne £100, and Lord Portman £50. A vote of thanks to the distinguished surgeon was proposed by Colonel Williams, M.P., and seconded by the Hon. E. W. B. Portman. Sir Frederick Treves, in reply, said that the ceremony that day represented a movement the magnitude of which it was not at first easy to appreciate. Twenty-five years ago that part of surgery which dealt with operations was more or less discredited. It was singularly disappointing and, he was sorry to say, singularly unsuccessful. The amount of work that was then done through operations was comparatively small. In the very largest surgical hospital in Great Britain there was only one operating theatre, and that was occupied only one afternoon in the week. In that identical hospital to-day there were five operating theatres, which, with adjuncts, extended over a quarter of a mile, and they were occupied practically every day in the week. This was all due to the introduction by Lord Lister of antiseptic surgery, which had rendered operative treatment possible. There was no new principle in operative surgery. There was no other way of dealing with a noxious growth than by taking it out, but what “Listerism” had done was to make these very obvious measures possible and safe. The result had been the saving of many thousands of lives annually, and the rescue of still more thousands from a state of hopeless illness. It had come about that the operating theatre, which was once the least attractive part of a hospital and the part that every one endeavoured very properly to avoid, had become a chamber of hope. All the hideous horrors of the old systems of the operating rooms had passed away. The performance of important operative surgery was no longer limited to London and a few great cities ; operative surgery had spread all over the country, and now nearly every provincial hospital had its own operating theatre. It was all part of a general movement which would result in bringing medical and surgical science to a higher level than had ever before been attained in this country.

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The Times, Saturday 2 March 1918, page 3 (extract)

News in Brief.

… Mr. Charles T. CARTER, dispenser to the Dorset County Hospital, Dorchester, has held the appointment for 48 years. …

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The Times, Monday 26 January 1925, page 14

DORSETSHIRE REGIMENT MEMORIAL.

Lord Shaftesbury, Lord-Lieutenant of Dorset, unveiled yesterday, at Dorchester, the memorial to the 3,900 officers and men of the Dorsetshire Regiment who fell in the war.  The funds for the memorial were subscribed by all ranks of the various battalions and by relatives of the fallen, and money was applied to the carrying out of a scheme of renovation at the Dorset County Hospital and endowment of two beds in perpetuity.  The names of the officers and men who gave their lives are inscribed in a Book of Remembrance in Sherborne Abbey.  A memorial tablet has been placed on the wall of the hospital and this was unveiled with military ceremonial.  There were present representatives of the six battalions (the 2nd Battalion bringing their band and colours from Aldershot), the Mayors of the boroughs of the County, and representatives of all local and patriotic bodies and the Society of Dorset Men in London.  There was a military parade in the barrack square, when a short religious service was held.  The troops then proceeded by slow march to the Hospital where the unveiling ceremony was carried out.

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The Times, Friday 18 February 1927, page 16

A new ophthalmic ward was presented yesterday to Dorset County Hospital, Dorchester, as a memorial to Mr. William WATKINS, for many years hon. secretary of the Society of Dorset Men in London.  The cost was borne by the society, supplemented by donations from the family, and gift was formally presented by Mr. H. Ll. WATKINS, who succeeded his father as hon. secretary.

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The Times, Wednesday 10 January, 1934, page 1

DEATHS

MEAD.–On Jan. 8, 1934, peacefully, at the Dorset County Hospital, Dorchester, REV. JASPER MEAD M.A., Vicar of St. Mary’s, Dorchester, son of the late George Edward and of Maude MEAD, aged 46.  R.I.P.  Funeral to-day (Wednesday), 11.15 a.m., at St. Mary’s Church, Dorchester.  No flowers.  (Other papers, please copy.)

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The Times, Thursday 25 October 1934 page 1

DEATHS

SIMONDS.–On Oct. 21, 1934, at the Dorset County Hospital, JOAN MARY, only daughter of the late ROBERT HENVILLE SIMONDS.  Funeral, after cremation at Winterbourne Abbas, at 3 p.m. to-day (Thursday).  No bought flowers, by request.

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The Times, Wednesday 30 June 1937, page 1

DEATHS

TOMS.–On June 29, 1937, at the Dorset County Hospital, KENNETH BOWRING TOMS, Captain, R.N. (retired), of Fordington House, Dorchester, Dorset.

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The Times, Saturday 4 September 1943, page 1

DEATHS

HODGES.–On Sept. 2, 1943, at The Annexe, Dorset County Hospital, LEONIE FRANCES, wife of WILFRID FRANCES HODGES, of Hillcrest, Queen’s Avenue, Dorchester.  Cremation, Weymouth, Monday, Sept, 6, strictly private.  No flowers.

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The Times, Friday 29 December 1944, page 1

DEATHS

COWEN.–On Dec. 27, 1944, at Dorset County Hospital, WILLIAM EVELYN COWEN, aged 69.

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The Times, Tuesday 21 August 1945, page 1

DEATHS

TENNYSON.–On Aug. 20, 1945 at Dorset County Hospital, Dorchester, MAJOR CHARLES ARTHUR TENNYSON, dearly loved husband of Bea TENNYSON (née HORNSBY) and youngest son of the late Captain and Mrs. Julius TENNYSON.  Funeral Thursday, 2.30 p.m., Dorchester Cemetery.

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