Accident reports 1840s

Newspaper source Article
Dorset County Chronicle, Thursday 16 June 1842, page 4 Caution.–A few days since a little boy, of this town, named BURT, put a stone into his ear ; and the circumstance being made known to his mother and sister, they, instead of taking the child at once to a surgeon in endeavouring to get out the stone forced it considerably further into the delicate organ. The little fellow was taken to the Dorset County Hospital on Tuesday morning, when, after much difficulty, the skilful practitioners of that excellent establishment extracted the stone, and the patient is doing well.
Sherborne Mercury, Saturday 28 September 1844, page 4 CORONER’S INQUEST.–An inquest was held on the body of John WOODSFORD, carter to Mr. Samson, of Kingston Russell, Longbredy, at the Dorset County Hospital, on Monday last, before Mr. Wallis, Coroner.  It appeared in evidence that a servant of the Rev. W. R. Churchill was out exercising his master’s horse on the Bridport road, and when near Damer’s barn, the deceased was seen behind a waggon endeavouring to get up from the road, where he was lying, but he fell down again; on going up to him, he was found to be insensible, on which assistance was obtained, and the man was taken immediately to the Hospital, where it was discovered that he was dead, but the House Surgeon, Mr. Emson, took him into the Hospital, where he was examined.  The deceased had evidently met his death by some accident, but no evidence could be procured to throw any light upon it.  Mr. Emson, on first examining the deceased, found a fracture of the large bone of the right leg, and a little skin off the right hand, but there were no marks of wheels on any part of the body.  A post mortem examination was afterwards made by Mr. Curme and Mr. Emson, when it was ascertained that there was a rupture of the liver, to the extent of six or seven inches, and four or five pints of blood had escaped into the cavity of the abdomen; from which death was caused.  The Coroner, having remarked upon the extraordinary nature of the case, and the absence of any evidence to show the cause of the accident, the jury returned a verdict in accordance with the facts elicited.  The deceased was a married man, but had no children; he was 36 year old, and bore an excellent character for steadiness and sobriety.
Sherborne Mercury, Saturday 25 January 1845, page 4 DORCHESTER HOSPITAL.–ACCIDENTS.–John RANDALL, one of the masons employed at the new church of All Saints, was working in the churchyard on Friday, when a large stone that was placed in a vault fell on him and broke both bones of his leg. He was immediately conveyed to the hospital. CAUTION TO PERSONS GETTING ON COACHES WHEN IN MOTION.–On Saturday last as James SMITH was endeavouring to get on the Mail Coach between the two wheels, his foot slipped and the hind wheel passed over the knee, causing a severe wound of the joint. He was also taken to the hospital, where we believe both cases are doing well.
Dorset County Chronicle, Thursday 6 February 1845, page 4 Shocking Accident.–On Saturday last, as a boy, named Francis WEST, in the employ of Mr. T. Lock of Higher Kingston Farm, was driving three horses with a dung-put, from Higher Bockhampton to his master’s farm, the horses started off at full speed, and the lad, who was riding on the shafts, in endeavouring to jump off, struck his foot against a post of a gate, which crushed it so much that amputation of the leg was rendered necessary, and was performed at the Dorset County Hospital the same afternoon, where the sufferer is now in a fair way of recovery.
Dorset County Chronicle, Thursday 13 February 1845, page 4 Accidents by Fire.–A little boy, aged 5 years, named Alfred POPLE, was dreadfully burnt about the chest and arms, on Thursday, at the residence of his parents on Glyde Path Hill, in this town [Dorchester], by his clothes accidentally taking fire during the temporary absence of his mother. The little sufferer was taken to the Dorset County Hospital, where everything that medical skill could devise has been done for him, but he still lies in a precarious state. [The other fire victim mentioned in this article, named Billet, aged about 7, of Fordington, does not appear to have been a patient of the hospital.]
Dorset County Chronicle, Thursday 6 March 1845, page 4 A woman, named Hannah WHITE, of Charminster, accidentally caught her clothining on fire, when she was in the act of putting her child into the cradle, on Tuesday, through which she was most severely burnt. She was afterwards taken to the Dorset County Hospital where she remains.
Hampshire Advertiser, Saturday 22 March 1845, page 8 INQUEST BY JOHN WALLIS ESQ.CORONER.–On the 12th inst. at the Dorset County Hospital, on the body of Hannah WHITE, who expired at the above Institution, in consequence of the severe injury she received from her clothes accidentally taking fire at her own house at Charminster.  Verdict accordingly.
Hampshire Advertiser, Saturday 30 August 1845, page 5 ACCIDENT.  On Monday last, as a party were proceeding from Bridport to Poole, in a four-wheel, the vehicle was accidentally upset, and they were thrown out into the road, by which means Mrs. LAWRENCE, of Poole, was very seriously injured, the ankle-joint being dislocated, and the bones, which were broken, protruding through the skin.  She was taken to Troy Town, being near the spot where the accident occurred, where the most kind and human attention was paid her, but she was afterwards removed to the Dorset County Hospital, where she remains in a precarious stage.
Sherborne Mercury, Saturday 18 October 1845, page 3 A dreadful accident occurred on Thursday to a carter who was driving his master’s waggon on the Weymouth road.  He was, by some means not yet explained, thrown under the waggon, the wheels of which passed over his head, fracturing the jaw and cheek bones in a most shocking manner.  The poor fellow was immediately conveyed to the Dorset County Hospital, where he now remains in a very precarious state.
The Morning Post, Saturday 13 December 1845, page 7 FATAL RAILWAY ACCIDENT.–On Monday afternoon, William COLE, one of the workmen employed on the Southampton and Dorchester Railway, near Moreton, had just unhooked his horses from the waggon, and removed them from the line of railway, when the foremost waggon caught him by the shoulder, knocked him down, and six waggons laden with earth passed over both legs, completely crushing them.  The poor fellow was immediately conveyed to the Dorset County Hospital, but he arrived there in so exhausted a state that he only lingered a few hours, when death put a period to his sufferings.  He was a native of Hatfield Peverel, near Witham, Essex, and his age twenty-three.  An inquest was held on his body yesterday (Wednesday) by John Wallis, Esq., Coroner, when after hearing the evidence, the Jury returned a verdict of “Accidental death.”–Dorset County Chronicle.
Sherborne Mercury, Saturday 21 March 1846, page 4 MANSLAUGHTLR. [sic]–Thomas Margrie, 37, a respcetable [sic]-looking man, was charged with the manslaughter of Louisa LAWRENCE, at Piddletown. Mr. Edwards demurred to the indictment, which he contended, ought to set out some unlawful act. He apprehended there was nothing unlawful in driving in a furious manner along the Queen’s highway. The Judge.–I should recommend you not to make the experiment. (Laughter.) Mr. Edwards wished to draw the distinction between a highway where few people were likely to be met, and a narrow street where many persons might be congregated, and where an accident from furious driving was likely to occur; but the Judge ruled that furious driving was an unlawful act, rendering the person guilty of it amenable to the laws. Mr. Poulden stated the case to the jury, in which he detailed the following facts:– On the 25th of August , 1845, the prisoner was driving a party, including his wife, the deceased Mrs. Louisa Lawrence, and her niece, Ann Weaver, on the road from Bridport to Poole. On several parts of the road the prisoner drove at a furious rate, and whipped the horse whilst going at a gallop down hill. This was particularly noticed at Longbredy Hut, and Winterbourne Abbas, and the deceased expressed her fears that an accident would happen, and said she would rather walk. In going down Yellowham-hill, about 3 ½ miles from Dorchester, the prisoner whipped the horse, and the deceased screamed out. Almost immediately after the carriage was driven on to a bank and upset, and all the parties were thrown out. The deceased niece lost her shoes, and the unfortunate deceased herself sustained severe bruises and injuries about the head and face, and a severe fracture of the bones of one of her legs, which were found protruding through the skin. She was removed in a cart to the Dorset County Hospital, where she was medically attended, but died on the 30th, after having suffered amputation of the leg. The prisoner spoke to her after the accident, and said he could not help it, but the deceased said it was all his fault. Verdict–Not guilty.
Dorset County Chronicle, Thursday 18 June 1846, page 4 Shocking and Fatal Accident.–A young man, named Henry ENGLAND, who was employed about a mile from Wareham on the works of the Southampton and Dorchester Line of Railway was brought to the Dorset County Hospital on Tuesday forenoon, in a most dreadful state, having bled profusely from his legs. On being examined, it was found that the poor fellow had received a most frightful laceration in one of his legs, which rendered amputation necessary, and that the bone of the other leg was fractured. Every thing that medical skill could devise was promptly done for the sufferer, but from his extreme state of exhaustion, through loss of blood, he died in about an hour after his arrival. It appeared that the deceased, who was eighteen years of age, was employed with a cart, on what, in the phraseology of railway men, is termed “tips;” and that having stumbled, he fell upon the sleeper, when the grooved wheel of the vehicle passed over and crushed his legs. An inquest was held on the body yesterday, before John Wallis, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable jury, when after a full investigation into the circumstances, a verdict was returned accordingly. It is remarkable that England, the day before the accident saved a boy from drowning, near the Mills, who had, in learning to swim, placed a quantity of bulrushes and flags under his armpits, when, upon getting into deep water the bundles slipped round, the boy sank under them, and must inevitably have lost his life, but that his companions raised an alarm, and England rushed off the rail, plunged in, and saved him.
Salisbury and Winchester Journal, Saturday 20 June 1846, page 3 (extract) Shocking and Fatal Accident.–A young man, Henry ENGLAND, who was employed about a mile from Wareham on the works of the Southampton and Dorchester Line of Railway, was brought to the Dorset County Hospital on Tuesday forenoon in a most dreadful state, having bled profusely from his legs.  On being examined, it was found that the poor fellow had received a frightful laceration in one of his legs, which rendered amputation necessary, and that the bone of the other leg was fractured.  Every thing that medical skill could devise was promptly done for the sufferer ; but, from his extreme state of exhaustion, through loss of blood, he died in about an hour after his arrival.  It appeared that the deceased, who was about eighteen years of age, was employed with a cart, on what, in phraseology of railway men, is termed “tip;” and, that having stumbled, he fell upon the sleeper, when the grooved wheel of the vehicle passed over and crushed his legs.  An inquest was held on the body on Wednesday…
Sherborne Mercury, Saturday 20 June 1846, page 4 On Tuesday, the following day, a young man was knocked down by the horse, which usually works at the Tip, and had both legs fractured.  He was removed to the Dorset County Hospital, but died soon after his admission.
Dorset County Chronicle, Thursday 9 July 1846, page 4 Accident.–On Tuesday morning, a youth, named John CORNISH, a tip driver, was conducting the waggons from the cutting near Meobury Rings when, on relieving the horse, the animal turned suddenly round, knocking him down ; the poor fellow fell across the rail, and a loaded waggon passed over his leg, causing a very severe compound fracture. He was taken to the Dorset County Hospital, and promptly examined by the able resident surgeon Mr. Luce, who found the injury so extensive as to render an operation necessary, which, after consultation between the medical officers, was skilfully performed, the leg being taken off above the knee. The patient is doing well, and receiving every care and attention in this excellent institution.
Dorset County Chronicle, Thursday 3 December 1846, page 4 (the same article appeared in Salisbury and Winchester Journal, Saturday 5 December 1846, page 3) Fatal Accident.–On Monday evening last, Robert TAYLOR, a man employed in the soap factory at Fordington, accidentally fell into a cauldron of boiling oil, and was so dreadfully scalded, that, notwithstanding the utmost skill was used and attention paid to his case in the Dorset County Hospital, the poor fellow died on the following morning.
Dorset County Chronicle, Thursday 3 December 1846, page 4 (the same article appeared in Salisbury and Winchester Journal, Saturday 5 December 1846, page 3) On Tuesday last, an accident happened to a man, named George MITCHELL, who was employed at a threshing-machine on the farm of Mr. Knight, at Nether Cerne.  His hand became entangled in the machinery, and was so dreadfully crushed that amputation was found necessary, which was performed in the Dorset County Hospital, by Mr. Tapp, under whose direction and the care of the resident surgeon the poor fellow is doing well.
Dorset County Chronicle, Thursday 3 December 1846, page 4 A youth, about seventeen years of age, who was employed on the works of the railway, at Grimston, was, on Tuesday, accidentally knocked down by one of the heavy trucks, and an iron bolt coming in contact with his skull, it was extensively fractured. He was taken to the Dorset County Hospital, where he now remains in a dangerous state, but hopes are entertained of his recovery.
Sherborne Mercury, Saturday 5 December 1846, page 4 SHOCKING ACCIDENT.–On Monday evening last, Robert TAYLOR, a man in the employ of John Hayne, Esq., at Fordington, accidentally fell into a copper of boiling oil.  The poor fellow, notwithstanding his extreme suffering, endeavoured to get out of the copper without any assistance.  As soon as he was discovered he was immediately conveyed to that excellent institution the Dorset County Hospital, where every attention was paid him; but without effect, the unfortunate sufferer enduring the most excruciating pain till Tuesday morning, when death released him from his suffering.
Salisbury and Winchester Journal, Saturday 9 January 1847, page 3 DREADFUL DEATH.–An elderly woman, named Ann HARRIS, who resided in the parish of All Saints, Dorchester, met her death on Thursday in a most deplorable manner.  In the afternoon, she was preparing a composition for polishing house furniture, composed of bees’ wax and turpentine, which she was in the act of incorporating over the fire when the preparation ignited and the flames caught some part of her dress.  She ran into the street for assistance, when, by the action of the air, the fire increased about her clothing and almost consumed it.  She was eventually wrapped up in a blanket, and water was thrown over her, but without any good effect.  She was taken to the Dorset County Hospital, and received the most prompt and kind attention of the excellent resident surgeon, who, on examination, found that she was burnt so dreadfully as to afford no hope of her recovering its effects.  She lingered out the night in a state of great suffering, but at half-past six o’clock on Friday morning death terminated her anguish.  An inquest was held the same day, in the Hospital, on the body by John Wallis, Esq., Coroner for the borough, when, after a due investigation of the circumstances, the jury returned a verdict, “Accidental Death.”–Dorset Paper.
Dorset County Chronicle, Thursday 22 April 1847, page 4 Dreadful Accident.–On Friday morning last, as Joseph HARDY, of Piddletown, was at work in one of the pits at Yellow-Ham hill, upwards of a ton of gravel suddenly fell upon him, under which the poor fellow remained for nearly two hours. He was at length got out, being in a state of insensibility and frightfully crushed, and his removal to the Dorset County Hospital was effected with all possible speed: into this admirable institution he was received, and his deplorable case was immediately attended to, when it was found, on examination, that he had sustained a general concussion, a severe fracture of the right thigh with much loss of blood, and internal injury of the abdomen. Every attention was paid to the sufferer, and all that superior skill could devise was done to administer relief, but from the severe and complicated nature of the case, little hope was entertained of his life being saved. The poor man died the same night and a post-mortem examination of the body having been made the next day, in accordance with the directions of the Coroner, John Wallis, Esq., before whom an inquest was held, it was found that the immediate cause of death was laceration of the bowels.–The jury returned a verdict, “Accidental Death.”
Salisbury and Winchester Journal, Saturday 24 April 1847, page 3 Dreadful Accident. –On Friday morning last, as Joseph HARDY, of Piddletown, was at work in one of the pits at Yellowham-hill, upwards of a ton of gravel suddenly fell upon him, under which the poor fellow remained for nearly two hours.  He was at length got out, being in a state of insensibility and frightfully crushed, and his removal to the Dorset County Hospital was effected with all possible speed:  here his deplorable case was immediately attended to, when it was found, on examination, that he had sustained a general concussion, a severe fracture of the right thigh with much loss of blood, and internal injury of the abdomen.  Every attention was paid to the sufferer, but in vain, since the poor man died the same night.  A post-mortem examination of the body having been made the next day, in accordance with the directions of the Coroner, John Wallis, Esq., before whom an inquest was held, it was found that the immediate cause of death was laceration of the bowels.  The jury returned a verdict of “Accidental Death.”
Sherborne Mercury, Saturday 24 April 1847, page 4 PIDDLETOWN.–On Saturday last, an inquest was held before John Wallis, Esq., coroner, on the body of Joseph HARDY, of Piddletown, who was killed on the previous day by a quantity of gravel falling upon him as he was at work in a pit, and under which the poor fellow remained for nearly two hours, before he was relieved.  He was taken to the Dorset County Hospital, where upon examination it was found that he had sustained a general concussion, a severe fracture of the right thigh with much loss of blood, and an internal injury of the abdomen.  The poor fellow died in the course of the night.  Verdict.–Accidental death.
Dorset County Chronicle, Thursday 29 April 1847, page 4 A man employed on the railway works, a short distance from this town [Dorchester], near the Weymouth road, named Thos. YOUNG, was knocked down by one of the heavy carts, on Friday morning, and the wheel passed over both his legs ; the left leg was fractured at the ankle joint, and the other leg much lacerated. He was taken to the Dorset County Hospital, where he is progressing most favourably.
Dorset County Chronicle, Thursday 27 May 1847, page 3 Accidents.–Two men, Robert FOOT and William HELLIER, were employed on the railway works of the Wilts, Somerset and Weymouth line, near Grimstone, on the 19th, filling waggons, when, apprehending danger from above them, Foot jumped off at a considerable height, from which he received a very severe sprain of the ankle, and injury to the heel bone: the sod came down upon Hellier, and completely buried him, but on being dug out, it was found that the injuries he had sustained were not of a serious nature.–On Friday, John STRONG, Thomas STUCKEY, and William HELLIER, who were at work on the railway cutting beyond the tunnel, at Frampton, were engaged, about three o’clock in the afternoon, in filling a set of waggons, when a large quantity of the upper soil gave way, and came down upon them with great force, burying Strong and Stuckey beneath the mass of earth and chalk, Hellier being forced, with terrific violence, and falling on the sleepers. The poor fellows were got out as soon as possible, but the injuries they had received were found to be very severe, particularly Strong, who was in a most deplorable and perilous state ; he had a compound fracture of the leg, a broken rib, a severe bruise in the back, and his head cut. Stuckey received a contused wound in the head, and was much bruised about the back, loins and shoulder. Hellier had a fractured scapula, various bruises in the back, and a lacerated cut in the head.–On Sunday afternoon, a boy, named Jessie TURNER, about eleven years of age, who, with some other boys, was on the line of the Dorchester and Southampton railway, near Stafford, incautiously endeavoured to push one of the heavy trucks forward, when it rebounded, and he was thrown down by the vehicle, his left leg being frightfully lacerated, and his right thigh broken. All these sufferers were promptly taken to the Dorset County Hospital, where they are progressing as favourably as from their respective cases could have been expected ; John Strong, we hear, cannot, as yet, be pronounced out of danger.
Dorset County Chronicle, Thursday 17 June 1847, page 4 Accident.–A man, named John PRINCE, employed on the works of the Wilts, Somerset and Weymouth Railway, on Tuesday, near Ridgway, was on a bench midway between the bottom of the cutting and surface of the upper soil, when a large stone rolled from above, and knocked him down, severely wounding him in the head ; and in falling upon some projecting pieces of rock below, his ribs were broken. The poor fellow was taken to the Dorset County Hospital, where he lies in a dangerous state.
Dorset County Chronicle, Thursday 15 July 1847, page 4 Accidents.–On Friday last, as a man named TREVIS, employed on the railway works, at Grimston, was in the tunnell [sic], he accidentally fell a sleep, and a wheel of one of the heavy trucks ran over him, by which his right leg was broken.–Richard LONG, who was at work at Ridgeway, on Wednesday, was severely injured in the left foot, by the falling of a large stone upon it.–Levi BALANCE, labourer, of Buckland, who walked with crutches fell on Monday, and unfortunately broke his thigh.–David CASHER, labourer, of Frome, who was employed in cutting vetches, on Wednesday, inflicted, by accident a severe injury in the bone of the right knee.–These men were respectively taken to the Dorset County Hospital, where they are progressing favourably.
Dorset County Chronicle, Thursday 11 November 1847, page 4 Severe Accident.–On the night of the 5th instant, Edward AYMER, a boy in the employ of Mr. Roper, stone-mason of Ridgway, had six serpents in his pockets for the purpose of increasing the display of fire-works in the village, but one of the other exhibitors, who had set off a rocket, passed near, and accidently ignited the serpents, by which Aymer’s cloths [sic] were nearly burnt off his body, and he received such personal injury as to endanger his life. He was immediately taken to the Dorset County Hospital, where his case was promptly examined and attended to by the efficient Resident Surgeon, Mr. R. C. Shettle, who found the poor fellow in a most perilous state. He is still lying in a very weak condition ; but from the skill and care of the medical officers and matron, it is hoped that he will soon recover.
Dorset County Chronicle, Thursday 17 February 1848, page 4. [According to the Salisbury and Winchester Journal version of this article –see next entry–and the hospital admissions records, Elizabeth Pitman was from Forston, not Portisham] Inquests by Mr. J. Wallis, Esq.–February 12th, at the County Hospital, Dorchester, on the body of John MELLISH, a labourer, who was employed at Poundbury on the works of the Wilts, Somerset, and Weymouth Railway. From the evidence, it appeared that the deceased was driving a tip-cart, on a portion of the works near the Barracks, when his foot slipped against one of the sleepers, and he fell across the rails, the cart, which was heavily laden, passing over both his legs, one of which was amputated immediately on his being taken to the hospital, and shortly after which he expired.–Verdict accordingly.–February 14, at the same place, on Robert WARREN, farm-servant of Chas. Porcher, Esq., who was wounded by a bull in the parish of Tincleton, on the 27th ult., from whence he was removed to the Dorset County Hospital, where he died on the 13th inst. Verdict, “Died, from injuries received from a bull.”–Also, the same day, on the body of Elizabeth PITMAN, of Portisham. It appeared that on the 2d instant the deceased was at work near an oven when her clothes caught fire, and before the flames could be extinguished she was dreadfully burnt. She was afterwards conveyed to the County Hospital, where she lay until the 13th instant, when she died of lock-jaw, occasioned by the effects of the fire.–Verdict, “Accidental death.”
Salisbury and Winchester Journal, Saturday 19 February 1848, page 3 Inquests by Mr. J. Wallis.– Feb. 12, at the County Hospital, Dorchester, on the body of John MELLISH, a labourer, who was employed at Poundbury on the works of the Wilts, Somerset, and Weymouth Railway.  Deceased was driving a tip-cart, on a portion of the works near the Barracks, when his foot slipped against one of the sleepers, and he fell across the rails, the cart, which was heavily laden, passing over both his legs, one of which was amputated immediately on his being taken to the hospital, and shortly after which he expired.  Verdict accordingly.–Feb. 14, at the same place, on Robert WARREN, farm-servant of Charles Porcher, Esq., who was wounded by a bull in the parish of Tincleton, on the 27th ult., from whence he was removed to the Dorset County Hospital, where he died on the 13thinst.  Verdict, “Died, from injuries received from a Bull.”–  Also, on the same day, on the body of Elizabeth PITMAN, of Forston.  It appeared that on the 2d inst. deceased was at work near an oven, where her clothes caught fire, and before the flames could be extinguished she was dreadfully burnt.  She was afterwards conveyed to the County Hospital, where she lay until the 13th inst., when she died of lock-jaw, occasioned by the effects of the accident.  Verdict, “Accidental death.”
Salisbury and Winchester Journal, Saturday 7 October 1848, page 3 Inquests held by Mr. J. Wallis.–September 28, at the Dorset County Hospital, on the body of Charles WHITE, who was brought dead to the Hospital on the same day. It appears that the deceased, who was a young man, aged about 19 years, was at work near the tunnel, at Fordington, on the Wilts, Somerset, and Weymouth Railway, and that while driving a one-horse wagon, he endeavoured to pick up a stick, and in so doing fell down on the rail, and the wheels of the wagon passing over his body, caused his immediate death. Verdict, “ Accidental Death.”–Oct. 2, at the same place, on the body of Henry COOMBER, who was killed at Monkton under the following circumstances :–William Petts, a manager of the Wilts, Somerset, and Weymouth Railway, deposed that the deceased was in his employ, and that he was about 22 years of age. On the 30th ult. he was driving six wagons drawn by two horses. He had on a very heavy great-coat, which witness warned him against wearing. Whilst driving the wagons near where witness was, he fell, from some cause not ascertained, and the wagons passed over him. He was out of his place between the rails when the accident happened. Verdict, “Accidental Death.”
Dorset County Chronicle, Thursday 14 June 1849, page 4 Accidents.–On Friday last, a labourer, named Noah FORD, met with a most serious accident at Wrackleford. He was employed on the works of the Wilts, Somerset, and Weymouth Railway now in progress, and while filling a waggon, about 30 yards of earth gave way, and falling on him, buried him beneath the soil. The poor fellow was speedily rescued from his perilous position, but was mangled in a most wretched manner. He was immediately conveyed to the Dorset County Hospital, where every attention that medical skill could suggest was paid to him ; but he lies in a very dangerous state, no hopes being entertained of his recovery.–On the same day, another serious accident occurred to a man named George BROWN, who was employed at the railway works at Poundbury, on the same line. It appeared that whilst driving one of the waggons, his foot slipped, and falling across the rail, the wheel of the waggon passed over his leg, near the ancle [sic]. He was then taken to the County Hospital, where his leg was skilfully amputated by G. W. Tapp, Esq., and hopes are entertained of his recovery.
Sherborne Mercury, Saturday 8 September 1849, page 4 DORSET COUNTY HOSPITAL.–On Thursday evening last Benjamin LAKE was brought into the hospital, having had his left hand crushed by a thrashing machine, while at work in Mr. Yearsley’s barn at Fordington.  The thumb was completely torn off this hand, and nothing could be done but amputation, which Mr. Curme very expeditiously and dexterously performed.  Richard CURME is also an inmate of the hospital, having fallen down a chalk-pit 12 feet deep while wheeling some bricks in Mr. Wellspring’s yard on Friday last.  He was seriously bruised and had one or two ribs broken.  He is now progressing favourably.  James FOX, of Stratton, is suffering from inflammation of the eye, in consequence of having struck that delicate organ with the lash of his whip.  George BROWN was admitted on Saturday, having been run over by a light cart.  The wheel passed over his arm, which caused much swelling but no fracture.  The accident happened in front of the hospital.
Sherborne Mercury, Saturday 10 November 1849, page 3 ACCIDENT.–On Thursday evening last, a man named Charles EMBREY, a carrier at Rampisham, was passing through Frampton with a waggon load of coals, and being somewhat the worse for liquor his foot slipped, and he fell under the waggon, the fore-wheel of which passed over his chest. R. B. Sheridan, Esq., M.P., who fortunately happened to be near at the time, had him promptly conveyed to the County Hospital, where it was ascertained that, in addition to being considerable bruised, two of his ribs were broken; he is however doing well.
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