Accident reports 1860s

Newspaper source Article
Sherborne Mercury, Tuesday 28 January 1862, page 6 FATAL ACCIDENT TO A WAGGONER.–An inquest was held at the Dorset County Hospital last Tuesday, before Giles Symonds, Esq., coroner, upon the body of Levi PARKER, a carter in the employ of Mr. Read, of Charminster.  The deceased had driven one of the three wagons laden with corn to Mr. Luckham’s, of Broadway, and when this side of Monckton turnpike gate on returning home, he was riding at the hrad [sic] of the last waggon.  The horses, in charge of the boy, became unmanageable and also started those in the next waggon, which was likewise driven by a boy, the two other carters riding in the first waggon.  Two women were in the third waggon, and they felt a jerk, and then saw the deceased in the road, he having fallen under the wheels, which had injured him in a very serious manner.  The Rev. J. P. F. Davidson happened to be near at the time, and immediately ran to his assistance, and it was at once deemed advisable to remove him to the Dorset County Hospital.  Mr. Tudor was quickly in attendance, though he pronounced the case hopeless, as the unfortunate man had suffered a fracture of the spine, besides which three ribs were broken, and the lungs perforated, under which injuries he sunk the same evening.  A verdict of “Accidental death” was returned.  Deceased has left a wife and five children.
Sherborne Mercury, Tuesday 15 April 1862, page 5 DORCHESTER. An accident was brought into the Dorset County Hospital on Tuesday morning, a youth named George TAYLOR, son of Wm. Taylor, of Broadmayne, having sustained a fracture of the thigh by falling under the wheels of a waggon, from which he was descending after riding a portion of the distance to school in Dorchester.
Dorset County Chronicle, Thursday 30 April 1863, page 3 THRASHING MACHINE ACCIDENT AT OWER MOIGNE.–On Saturday afternoon a somewhat serious case was brought to the Dorset County Hospital, a labourer named HELYAR, having that morning had his hand drawn into a thrashing machine, at Ower Moigne, whereby the fingers and palm were crushed in a very shocking manner.  It was soon apparent that amputation was unavoidable, and the operation was successfully performed the same day, and the unfortunate man, under the careful treatment of the staff of this excellent institution, is now progressing favourably.
Dorset County Chronicle, Thursday 9 July 1863, page 3 SERIOUS ACCIDENT–On Monday week an accident happened to a boy named PLOWMAN, residing at Stinsford, which nearly proved fatal.  It appears that he got a piece of piping of some kind and filled with powder and steel filings, and then applied a match to it, when the plug blew out, by which he was severely injured.  He was removed to the Dorset County Hospital, where his sufferings were promptly attended to.
Dorset County Chronicle, Thursday 27 August 1863, page 4 OSMINGTON. ACCIDENT IN A WELL.–On Saturday last a labourer, named Charles SCRIMMAGE, was engaged in sinking a well at Upton Farm, and when he had got down about fifteen feet the sides fell in upon him, and nearly buried him alive.  He was, however, fortunately rescued by some parties near, when it was found that his leg was broken; and he was conveyed to the Dorset County Hospital, where he received every attention his case required, and is now progressing favourably.
Dorset County Chronicle, Thursday 16 June 1864, page 4 WIMBORNE. AN ACCIDENT happened on Wednesday last to John CHRISTOPHER, by a block of timber falling upon him and breaking his leg, whilst working an engine in this town for Mr. John Murton, of Brockenhurst.  He was the same day taken to the Dorset County Hospital, where he received every attention, and is going on well.
Dorset County Chronicle, Thursday 22 September 1864, page 5 WAREHAM. AN ACCIDENT of rather a serious character happened yesterday (Wednesday) to two men named John CHAPMAN and Lot BELING.  It appeared that they were working at the Wareham ballast hole, when all of a sudden some “muck” fell on them, seriously injurying John Chapman internally, but the other was more fortunate, and though injured was conveyed to his home.  Chapman was immediately taken to the Dorset County Hospital, where no doubt he will receive all the care that his case requires.
Dorset County Chronicle, Thursday 13 October 1864, page 3 ACCIDENT AT MONCKTON.–An accident occurred on Tuesday morning last to a man named William BISHOP, in the employ of J. B. Phelps, Esq., of Monckton.  He was letting down a bag of wool from the loft, when he fell from the steps to the ground, pitching on his head.  He was immediately conveyed to the Dorset County Hospital, where it was found he had sustained a wound on the scalp.
Dorset County Chronicle, Thursday 27 October 1864, page 3 AN ACCIDENT happened on Friday evening last to a man named BISHOP, belonging to Milborne St. Andrew.  It appears that whilst he was carrying a sack of flour to the co-operative stores from a miller’s waggon, belonging to Mr. Buckland, of Piddlehinton, on stepping upon the pavement by some means he fell, breaking his left leg.  He was immediately conveyed to the Dorset County Hospital, where he is progressing favourably.
Dorset County Chronicle, Thursday 27 October 1864, page 3 PLAYING WITH GUNPOWDER.–An accident happened on Monday last to two lads named MEECH and WHITE, pupil teachers at the National School, by which one of them was severely burnt.  It appears that they had some powder in a parcel, and having pricked a hole in it Meech shook the powder on a lighted match, the consequence being an explosion, by which Meech’s face and hands were very much burnt.  White received only a slight damage to his face.  They both went to the Dorset County Hospital, where they received every attention; but Meech is still confined there, though progressing favourably.
Sherborne Mercury, Tuesday 4 April 1865, page 6 FATAL ACCIDENT.–A man named James WELLSTEAD was employed on Major Frampton’s farm, on Monday, attending to some machinery, when one of the wheels broke suddenly, and he was severely shaken and bruised by the spokes and splinters.  He was taken to the Dorset County Hospital, where he was kindly and promptly treated, but he never rallied from the shock, and died on Thursday morning.
Sherborne Mercury, Tuesday 11 April 1865, page 4 ACCIDENT.–The custom of changing service annually on old Lady-Day largely prevails amongst the agricultural labourers of this part of the country.  On the roads in this neighbourhood, on the 6th, many wagons were to be seen conveying labourers, with their families and all their belongings, from old employments to new engagements.  A man named Robert CRANN was thus proceeding to Mr. Symes’s, of Nether Cerne, and when on the Maiden Newton road, near this town, in endeavouring to get upon the wagon his foot slipped between the spokes of one of the wheels, and he sustained a compound fracture of the right leg.  He was conveyed to the Dorset County Hospital, and promptly attended to.  He is now favourably progressing.
Sherborne Mercury, Tuesday 9 May 1865, page 4 SERIOUS ACCIDENT.–On Tuesday evening last a serious accident occurred to a man named George TRAVERS, in the employ of Mr. Emson, surgeon, South-street, as groom.  About half-past seven o’clock he was standing on a ladder, which was held at the foot by a bar of iron, cleaning an upper window, in Mr. Emson’s house.  The ladder slipped, and Travers fell to the ground, striking upon the iron bar, which broke in his ribs.  His knee cap was also fractured by the fall.  He was taken to the County Hospital, and everything done for him that medical skill could devise, but the injury he sustained is of a very serious character, and his condition is critical.
Sherborne Mercury, Tuesday 9 May 1865, page 4 DORSET COUNTY HOSPITAL.–A lad named John PURCHASE, of Fordington, who had been thrown from a cart near the Great Western Hotel, was taken to the Hospital on Wednesday.  He had sustained considerable damage about his head by the fall, but is progressing favourably. –On Saturday Mr. Emson’s groom, TRAVERS, who received severe injuries by falling from a ladder, was in a more hopeful condition.
Sherborne Mercury, Tuesday 30 May 1865, page 5 WEYMOUTH. ACCIDENT.–A man named Samuel BARTLETT, in the employ of Mr. Groves, brewer, was driving a waggon from Broadmayne to Whitcombe, on Wednesday, and whilst standing on the shafts he used the whip, which caused the horse to start forward suddenly, and he was thrown under the wheels.  He was taken to the Dorset County Hospital, and was found to have sustained a severe contusion of the thigh.  Fortunately, no bones were broken.  He is progressing toward recovery.
Sherborne Mercury, Tuesday 20 June 1865, page 7 GRIMSTONE. ACCIDENT.–On Sunday morning, an elderly man named CROCKER, was holding the head of a horse that was standing, harnessed to an empty waggon, at Grimstone, when a train passed by on the railway, frightening the horse, and causing it to start off suddenly at a rapid pace.  The poor man was knocked down, and one of the wheels of the wagon passed over his body, fracturing several of his ribs.  He was conveyed to the Dorset County Hospital, where he is in a fair way for recovery.
Sherborne Mercury, Tuesday 5 September 1865, page 7 ACCIDENT.–On Friday, about noon, John WEEKS, a strong powerful young man, aged 25, a helper connected with the ballast trains, was endeavouring to pass over some empty trucks as they were in motion, when he missed his footing and fell through.  Two of the trucks passed up his leg, over his thigh, over his left shoulder and hand.  The flesh was considerably lacerated, but remarkable to state, no bones were broken.  He was immediately conveyed to the Dorset County Hospital, where he still lies.  We are happy to say that he is progressing favourably.
Sherborne Mercury, Tuesday 24 October 1865, page 5 SERIOUS ACCIDENT.–On Thursday last, a sad accident befel [sic] a young man, from Ringwood, while working on the railway a little above the Poole junction.  It appears that he was connected with a ballast train, and while standing on one of the buffers, as the train was in motion, his foot slipped, and one leg was caught under the wheel.  He was immediately picked up and taken to the Dorset County Hospital, at Dorchester, when it was found that the bones of the foot, the ancle [sic], and a little above the ancle [sic], were completely smashed, and that amputation was indispensable.  The leg was consequently taken off a little above the knee.  He is going on quite as favourably as could be expected.
Sherborne Mercury, Tuesday 2 January 1866, page 5 ACCIDENTS.–On the evening of Christmas-day, a man named MEECH, of Up-Cerne, who had been out holiday making, was thrown out of his car when returning home, and sustained concussion of the brain.  He was brought to the Dorset County Hospital, where he receives that skilful treatment and attention which such a case demands.–On Thursday last a labourer named Robert TRAVERS, in the service of Mr. Taylor, of Fordington, was riding on the top of a load of straw, which, in being conveyed to its destination, had to pass under the railway-bridge, near Mr. Haynes’s orchard.  Just before coming to the bridge, Travers found that it would not admit of his passing beneath it, but before he could call for the horses to be stopped, his head came in contact with the structure and he fell backwards to the ground, receiving considerable injuries.  He was taken to the hospital, and it is hoped that he will soon be restored to health.
Sherborne Mercury, Tuesday 27 February 1866, page 5 ACCIDENT.–On Friday week, William STANFIELD, a carter, residing at Alton, was riding on a waggon near that place, he fell from it, and a wheel passed over his leg.  He was taken to the Dorset County Hospital, when it was found that his leg was fractured, and his knee joint injured.  He is now recovering.
Dorset County Chronicle, Thursday 1 March 1866, page 3 ACCIDENTS.–Two accidents, though not of a very serious nature, have been admitted into the Dorset County Hospital.  Ambrose WELLMAN, a carrier, of Woodsford, with broken leg from a fall, and William STANSFIELD, a carter, of Alton, with a similar injury, sustained by a fall from a waggon.  Both are progressing favourably.
Dorset County Chronicle, Thursday 22 March 1866, page 3 ACCIDENT.–A sad accident happened on Monday evening last, when a little girl named PEARCE, about three years of age, who resided with her parents in Grove Buildings, fell out of the first-floor window, a depth of some 12 or 14 feet.  She was immediately conveyed to theDorset County Hospital, where it was found she had sustained a concussion of the brain.  We are glad to hear she is progressing towards recovery.
Sherborne Mercury, Tuesday 27 March 1866, page 7 DANGEROUS FALL OF A CHILD. —  A boy, between three and four years of age, the son of Mr. PEARCE, Grove Buildings, was left upstairs on Monday evening, and ere long fell from the second-storey window to the ground, head foremost.  The child was carried to theDorset County Hospital, when it was found that he had sustained concussion of the brain, in addition to superficial wounds.  Under the skilful treatment, however, there afforded, he is doing well.
Dorset County Chronicle, Thursday 5 April 1866, page 3 FATAL TERMINATION TO AN ACCIDENT.–During the boisterous weather that was experienced in this neighbourhood on Friday week last, an accident of a shocking character happened to a young man, named Joseph WHITTLE, a labourer, in the employ of Mr. Hawkins, of Martinstown.  The unfortunate man was feeding a steam thrashing-machine, and, whilst standing on a hurdle, which was used to contain the sheaves, by some means a gust of wind caused the man’s footing to slip from under him, and he was precipitated into the machine.  The engine was stopped with the utmost possible speed, but the poor fellow was most severely injured, and was at once conveyed to the Dorset County Hospital, when it was found both bones of the right leg were broken below the knee, the foot being frightfully smashed, and other severe bruises were sustained.  It was considered necessary to amputate the leg, but, although he continued to receive every attention in the house, death put an end to his sufferings about six o’clock on Saturday morning last. Deceased was 25 years of age, was not married, and was a native of Chickerell.
Dorset County Chronicle, Thursday 19 April 1866, page 3 ACCIDENT TO A CHILD.–A sad accident happened to a little boy, named Emanuel DAVIS, aged 9 years, on Saturday last.  It appears he was employed at Puddletown at “bird-scaring,” and in getting over a hedge fell and broke his leg.  He was taken on Sunday morning to theDorset County Hospital, where he is now progressing favourably.
Dorset County Chronicle, Thursday 26 April 1866, page 3 ACCIDENT.–A painful accident happened on Wednesday afternoon last to a man named Joseph SMART, aged 50 years, who had been in the employ of Mr. Manley, at the King’s Arms Hotel.  As he was attending to a chaff-cutting machine he accidentally got his hand into contact with the knife, which immediately divided the bone of the thumb of his right hand and lacerated the flesh very severely.  He was admitted into Dorset County Hospital, when it was found necessary to amputate the thumb.
Sherborne Mercury, Tuesday 8 May 1866, page 5 PORTLAND. ACCIDENTS.–On Wednesday a man named KATES met with a serious accident in the quarries.  The “buffer” of a stone waggon came so suddenly upon him that his hand was crushed against a large stone upon which it rested.  He was immediately conveyed to the Dorset County hospital. –On Wednesday the marriage of Mr. William John Pearce and Miss Janet Hine was celebrated, and, as a matter of course, the firing of guns, &c., was the sequence.  A cousin of the bridegroom, Mr. Edward John PEARCE, had bravely discharged his piece some two or three times; but on loading again (the socket being hot), the powder exploded, and the charge seemed to have almost shattered the hand of the unfortunate man, and it may be a long time ere he can again resume the use of the suffering, though all-important limb.
Dorset County Chronicle, Thursday 10 May 1866, page 3 ACCIDENTS.–The past week has witnessed quite a chapter of accidents, some of which have been of a most serious character.  On Sunday evening last Mr. NORRIS, veterinary surgeon, of Fordington, fell whilst walking on the law in front of Mr. Redwood’s house, and broke his leg. –On Saturday last a lad eight years of age, named William DAVIS, whose parents reside at Puddletown, was riding a horse to grass, when the animal laid down and rolled over him, fracturing the lad’s arm.  He was taken to the Dorset County Hospital, where he is progressing favourably. –Another lad was admitted into the hospital on Tuesday, having sustained a severe fracture of the thigh.  The boy, whose name is George WHEELER, twelve years of age, and was in the employ of Mr. Palmer, of West Bexington, was leading a horse, when he was knocked down, and sustained the serious injury. –On Wednesday last an accident happened to a man named John KATES, whilst employed in the quarries at Portland.  The unfortunate man was admitted into the Dorset County Hospital, where it was found he had sustained severe laceration of the muscles and skin of the left hand and fore arm, caused by his hand being jammed between a waggon and a wall.  It was thought necessary to amputate the arm, but the man refused to have it done, and consequently is not going on as well as could otherwise be expected.  It is feared that lock-jaw might ensue. –On Saturday afternoon an accident occurred which caused the greatest alarm amongst passengers in the street.  It appears that, as a sawyer named Frederick Landscheit, of Charminster, was leaving a cottage in the narrow thoroughfare behind Mr. Steele’s, draper, he fell, and a loaded double-barrelled gun which he carried in two parts in his pockets exploded with a loud noise.  Unfortunately, the result was somewhat serious, the shots wounding two persons who were passing at the time.  Mrs. TREVISS, of West Knighton, received a shot in her cheek, and her daughter, Lucy WATTS, was rather severely injured in the calf of her leg.  Mr J. R. Taylor assisted the girl to the hospital, where she is doing well, and will soon be discharged.  Landscheit says he was unaware the gun was loaded; but there are conflicting statements respecting it.  It is generally believed, however, that the gun was not capped, but that the explosion occurred through the breaking of a nipple from the barrel.
Dorset County Chronicle, Thursday 19 July 1866, page 3 ACCIDENTS.–On Tuesday, the 10th inst., a serious accident happened to a man named John DOWNTON, labourer, of Roddon Farm.  Whilst engaged at work on a rick he by some means fell off and broke his leg.  The unforutnate man lay under the rick all night, and on Wednesday morning was carried to the Dorset County Hospital, where it was found he had sustained a severe fracture of the left leg.  He is at present going on very favourably.
Sherborne Mercury, Tuesday 11 September 1866, page 5 DORCHESTER. ACCIDENT.–A gardener of Loders, near Bridport, named Lazarus MARSH, was taking a bag containing vegetables from his waggon standing at Glyde-path-hill last Friday, when he over balanced himself, fell upon the stones, and sustained a severe cut on the head.  He was removed to the Dorset County Hospital.
Dorset County Chronicle, Thursday 13 September 1866, page 3 ACCIDENTS.–On Wednesday last an accident happened to a man named John DARE, carter, in the employ of Mr. J. Samways, of Evershot.  He was returning home with an empty waggon, when, from some unaccountable cause, the horse became restive.  The unfortunate man in endeavouring to stop the animal, held the shafts for a considerable time, but could get no nearer the horse’s head.  He held on till quite exhausted, when he fell, the front wheel passing over him, and he was by some means caught by the hind wheel, which threw him a considerable distance against a wall, the hind wheel at the same time coming off.  He was immediately taken to the Dorset County Hospital, where it was found that he had very severe injuries to the left thigh, and a cut on the left wrist, as well as being very much shaken and bruised.  He is now going on favourably.–On Friday last an accident happened to a man named Lazarus MARSH, gardener at Loders, near Bridport.  He had come to Dorchester with a horse and waggon.  When at Glyde-path Hill he was in the act of taking a bag containing vegetables from the waggon, and in some way overbalanced himself, when he fell on the stones, receiving a severe cut on the head. He was at once taken to the hospital.–On Saturday last an accident happened to a lad, named READ, in the employ of Mr. Taylor, machinist of this town. He was engaged in working a machine when his hand was caught, completely smashing one of his fingers.  He was taken to the Dorset County Hospital, when the finger was amputated, and is now nearly well.–On Tuesday last a man named George SIBLY, of Ansty, in the employ of Mr. Whiteman, of Sydling, was admitted into the hospital, having sustained an accident whilst engaged in roofing some building at Ansty.  The unfortunate man fell from the scaffolding, and received a severe scalp wound with a fracture of the skull.
Sherborne Mercury, Tuesday 18 September 1866, page 5 ACCIDENT.–On Saturday week Daniel READ, of Grove-buildings, was received into the Dorset County Hospital with a lacerated finger.  He was at Mr. Taylor’s, machinist, as a probationer for apprenticeship, and one of his hands became entangled in an engine at work, by which his finger was crushed.  Amputation was found to be necessary.
Sherborne Mercury, Tuesday 18 September 1866, page 5 SERIOUS ACCIDENT.–On Tuesday last, George SIBLEY, of Ansty, aged 44, in the employ of Mr. Wightman, of Sydling, was engaged roofing a house at Ansty, when, by some means, he fell from the scaffolding, sustaining serious injuries.  On being admitted into theCounty Hospital the same evening, it was found that he had received a severe scalp wound, and had also fractured his skull.
Sherborne Mercury, Tuesday 30 October 1866, page 5 ACCIDENT.–Robert KENDALL, an elderly man of Dorchester, met with an accident on Tuesday.  He was at a sand pit, near Dudle [Durdle?], where he was digging sand, when a part of the top of the pit fell in, and he was covered beneath it, whereby he received a dislocation of his collar-bone, but is getting on favourably at the Dorset County Hospital.
Dorset County Chronicle, Thursday 17 January 1867, page 11 THRASHING MACHINE ACCIDENT On Monday evening last a serious accident happened to a young man named Charles BRIDLE, aged 21, in the employ of Mr. Sprake, of Gorwell, Abbotsbury, Dorset. He was engaged in feeding a thrashing machine, when by some means both arms became entangled in the machinery, causing such injuries as to render amputation necessary shortly after his admission into the Dorset County Hospital. Up to the present time we are glad to say he is doing well.
Dorset County Chronicle, Thursday 7 February 1867, page 1 (repeated on Thursday 14 February 1867, page 1) A CASE OF REAL DISTRESS. The kind Assistance of the Benevolent is earnestly entreated on behalf of Charles BRIDLE, a very industrious young labourer, who lately had the misfortune to lose both his arms by an accident with a Steam Thrashing Machine. Contributions (which will be duly acknowledged) will be thanfully received by the authorities of the Dorset County Hospital, also at the Banks of Messrs. Williams, in Weymouth and Dorchester, and by Dr. Parker, Abbotsbury.
Dorset County Chronicle, Thursday 14 February 1867, page 3 ACCIDENT.–On Wednedsay last an accident happened to a man named James TOMS, labourer in the employ of Mr. Jesty, of Radipole.  He was engaged at work in a gravel pit at Upwey, when some part gave way and fell upon him.  He was taken to the Dorset County Hospital, where it was found that the unfortunate man had received a severe fracture of the left leg, together with injuries to the eye and right wrist.  He is going on favourably.
Sherborne Mercury, Tuesday 19 February 1867, page 6 UPWEY. ACCIDENT.–A man named James TOMS, labourer in the employ of Mr. Jesty, of Radipole, was engaged at work in a gravel pit at Upway last week, when some part gave away and fell upon him.  He was taken to the Dorset County Hospital, where it was found that he had received a severe fracture of the left leg, together with injuries to the eye and right wrist.  He is going on favourably.
Dorset County Chronicle, Thursday 20 June 1867, page 5 WINFRITH. ACCIDENT.–On Thursday last a rather serious accident happened to a boy named Frank DAWE, aged 15.  The unfortunate lad, with others in the employ of Mr. Keynes, of Winfrith, was engaged in catching a colt.  They succeeded so far as to get the animal up in a corner, when it had no other chance of getting away than by jumping over one of the boys; and Dawe being the shortest the animal leaped over him, and in so doing struck him a very severe blow in the face, kicking one of his cheek bones out, besides inflicting a wound extending from the eye nearly to the ear.  The poor lad was taken to the Dorset County Hospital, where, with careful treatment, we are glad to say he is progressing favourably.
Dorset County Chronicle, Thursday 11 July 1867, page 3 A LITTLE GIRL, nine years of age, named Emma BURROWS, whose parents reside at Frampton, was admitted into the Dorset County Hospital on Wednesday, having sustained a fracture of the right fore arm. She was playing with some other children, when one of them pushed her and broke her arm.
Dorset County Chronicle, Thursday 8 August 1867, page 3 ACCIDENT.–On Monday evening last a rather serious accident happened to a man named Harry HAYTER, in the employ of Messrs. Wellspring and Son, builders, of this town. He was engaged in grooving wood with one of Sketchley’s machines, and whilst taking a corner off a piece of wood the spar flew in his face, and dealt him a severe blow, cutting the upper part of his left eye. He was taken to the Dorset County Hospital, and was attended to by the house surgeon, Mr. Bennett. Had the wound been a little lower the result might have been very serious.
Dorset County Chronicle, Thursday 26 September 1867, page 3 ACCIDENTS.–A rather serious accident happened on Friday evening last to the Rev. Mr. MANN, who only a fortnight since succeeded the Rev. Mr. Jones as the resident minister of the Wesleyan connection in this town.  Returning from a drive about ten o’clock, he was coming down Prince’s-street on the way to his stable in Trinity-street, when on passing the Greyhound Inn the horse shied at the flickering of a lantern and dashed off rapidly down the street.  The pace was so great that he was unable to turn into Trinity-street, and the vehicle came with a terrific smash against the corner wall leading into the Antelope yard.  Mr. Mann was thrown into the road and received very severe lacerations of the scalp and eye, and on his being removed in an insensible condition to the Dorset County Hospital it was found that he had sustained concussion of the brain.  We are glad to hear that his injuries are not so dangerous as was at first supposed, and that he will soon be able to leave the hospital. –About noon on Saturday a little boy, twelve years of age, named Thomas BRINE, was admitted into the Dorset County Hospital, having received injuries by falling under the wheels of a cart.  He was in the employ of Mr. Robert Hayne, of Fordington, and, whilst leading a horse which was drawing a dung cart, he fell, and the wheels passed over his legs, bruising them very severely.  He is still under medical treatment.
Dorset County Chronicle, Thursday 31 October 1867, page 3 ACCIDENT.–A serious accident happened on Monday to a man named William SEAL, a labourer engaged at the Antelope Hotel stables.  He was feeding a chaff-cutting machine, driven by horse-power, when by some means his hand slipped, and before he could withdraw it the fingers of his right hand were cut completely off, and the back of the hand lacerated in a most painful manner. The poor fellow is now under medical treatment at the Dorset County Hospital.
Western Gazette, Friday 27 December 1867, page 8 CERNE ABBAS. On Thursday, a middle-aged man, named George CHEESMAN, was admitted into the Dorset County Hospital with both legs fractured.  He was in the employ of Mr. James Chick, of Cerne Abbas, and was working in a chalk pit, when a mass of chalk fell, and inflicted upon him the injury stated. He is now progressing favourably.